Kimani Jones Young part II

allminer

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Feb 12, 2005
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One interesting quote in the article coming straight out of Kimani's mouth that I'm surprised no one has touched on.

"Kids haven't really changed," he said. "The people around the kids have changed, though. I would call home to my mother and talk about not playing enough or getting yelled at and her message was to work harder, fight through adversity, become stronger. Today kids call an AAU coach and they say they will find another place for you. It's happening all over the country ... 700 to 800 transfers a year.

For the most part, it is my perception that the majority of this board has dismissed or mocked Floyd when he brings up the transfer epidemic. In some cases I can see why, as some of the transfers have certainly been Floyd's and the staff's own doing. That's undeniable. However, I find Kimani's take on today's kids interesting, though he did tiptoe around it. Kimani points out that it was much harder for him to just up and leave a situation he was not comfortable with and his support system basically wouldn't allow it. In other words, face the music, support your choice and tough it out. In today's instant gratification world, that is all but none existent. If a player isn't instantly playing over 20 minutes a game and being praised for his skills, then he'll up and go somewhere where they will. The work needed to get there is not a priority nor recognized in many of today's cases. However, I think Kimani tiptoes around it by saying it's not the kids, its the system around the kids. The AAU coaching, which may be true to some extent, and brings me to another point. The AAU and prep school conundrum.

I would say the purpose of the AAU and prep schools was to allow these kids to hone their skills and academic qualifications for a shot at a scholarship to play college hoops. Nothing wrong with that. However, its evident that it has morphed into an auction league of sorts for many of these AAU and prep school coaches. It is evident many of these coaches are "steering" players to particular schools or schools, and the coaches themselves may be up for auction for helping steer a player to a certain school. If it turns out that player doesn't find that school satisfactory, he just calls his agent/coach.

http://www2.kusports.com/news/2010/may/29/coach-defends-pump-n-run/

http://www.espn.com/mens-college-basketball/columns/story?id=3710807&columnist=oneil_dana

An excerpt from Roland Lazenby's book The Facilitator :
The Amateur Athletic Union (AAU)
There's a saying that amateur status is highly prized in America. But like virginity, it's difficult to ascertain.

I've coached AAU basketball, and I have a sense of how the game works. One of the things is that it's almost impossible to lock a player to one team. So players are constantly being recruited from one team to the next.

Perhaps one of the biggest revenue streams for facilitators is in AAU basketball. Wes has his strong connections to AAU basketball. AAU basketball is a big factor in this.

The competition in this game is just amazing. But a part of the game, at a certain level, is just amazingly cynical.

An AAU coach is a connection for funding. AAU teams are non-profit, but the coach can get paid nicely. There is relentless recruiting for the top players. There is shoe money. There is equipment.

Wes has supported The Family. I'm under the impression he was also involved with AAU in Camden, although I'd have to check that out.

One of the girls on my team, her parents were very aggressive in wondering things like what AAU scholarships are available, what college coaches might be able to see her, what equipment... You have families in need and there's a lot of "what's in it for me." This is the game you play to get noticed. It's like the payola of the music industry years ago. You need someone to help you shop around for the best offer: which team, which location, which freebies, which coach, which connections does that coach have... There's a whole structure there that has evolved for basketball.


What to do? Ha, thats the NCAA baby. I don't have the answers. What I do know is today's coaches have to walk a very fine line with the AAU and prep school coaches. A line and a bridge many on here have pointed Floyd and his staff have burned.
 

Roy_Bigwood_05

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Dec 22, 2016
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Good stuff bro. It's like he's not trying to throw his AAU contacts under the bus for recruiting purposes with his comments, but knows it's not a perfect system.

But you're right, most of these prep and AAU deals are now like acting agents for college kids and that's not teaching kids how to deal with adversity like you mention.

+1
 

unihorn

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I'm a parent of two Millennial young men.

I'd say parents now are WAY more kid-centric than my parents were with me. I'm not really sure how or why that happened. Adolescence has generally also been extended in years.

We'll see how they turn out. I'm sure in some ways they'll be "better" and in some ways "worse."
 
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MineroFanatico

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I'm a parent of two Millennial young men.

I'd say parents now are WAY more kid-centric than my parents were with me. I'm not really sure how or why that happened. Adolescence has generally also been extended in years.

We'll see how they turn out. I'm sure in some ways they'll be "better" and in some ways "worse."

Based on the ages of your kids, which you posted the other day, my two are about the same age...a tad older, and I totally agree with you.
 
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unihorn

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Based on the ages of your kids, which you posted the other day, my two are about the same age...a tad older, and I totally agree with you.

Not to psycho-babble, but maybe some of us are overcompensating for our perception that our parents weren't involved enough?

I work with young adults, and you definitely have to wear a velvet glove over your iron fist with them.
 

MineroFanatico

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Not to psycho-babble, but maybe some of us are overcompensating for our perception that our parents weren't involved enough?

I work with young adults, and you definitely have to wear a velvet glove over your iron fist with them.

Lol at that last part. I think in general you are probably right. I, however, cannot use that as an excuse. My pops coached my soccer teams and my baseball teams until I was about 12, was at almost every game after that, went on weekend backpacking trips into the mountains as a family, and frequently just made himself available for me and my sister.

Perhaps some of my overcompensation is due to the fact that if my grades were not to my parents liking, and often times they weren't, my mom would ground me for a whole 6 weeks at a time until said grades were brought up to par. As a result, neither of my boys have ever been grounded in their lives. Lol! Evidence of what you speak of.
 
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unihorn

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Lol at that last part. I think in general you are probably right. I, however, cannot use that as an excuse. My pops coached my soccer teams and my baseball teams until I was about 12, was at almost every game after that, went on weekend backpacking trips into the mountains as a family, and frequently just made himself available for me and my sister.

Perhaps some of my overcompensation is due to the fact that if my grades were not to my parents liking, and often times they weren't, my mom would ground me for a whole 6 weeks at a time until said grades were brought up to par. As a result, neither of my boys have ever been grounded in their lives. Lol! Evidence of what you speak of.

No training or certification or experience required for parenthood...
 

MineroFanatico

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No training or certification or experience required for parenthood...

Thank gawd, or they probably wouldn't have let me become one...and my kids have turned out to be pretty damn good citizens of the universe if I do say so myself.
 
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Jan 2, 2017
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I'd say parents now are WAY more kid-centric than my parents were with me. I'm not really sure how or why that happened. Adolescence has generally also been extended in years.

I think it really just depends who you talk to. I know a number of millennials whose parents weren't there for them- didn't get involved in their activities, rarely played ball with them, etc. And I also know a number of people who are older whose parents were always there for them. I think that goes for every generation.
 

unihorn

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I think it really just depends who you talk to. I know a number of millennials whose parents weren't there for them- didn't get involved in their activities, rarely played ball with them, etc. And I also know a number of people who are older whose parents were always there for them. I think that goes for every generation.

Yeah, generalities often miss the mark.
 
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